To Quote The Great Bard

What’s your favorite quote from Hamlet?  Cite and explain.  The best bars will win a pair of Nutty Bars.

Example:

Act 3, Scene 4, Line 118

“Conceit in weakest bodies strongest works.”  — Ghost

The second to last line spoken by the Ghost, who the audience assumes is the murdered father of Hamlet — the former King — traditionally serves as a warning to Hamlet to spare his mother.  At the core of the quote lies the word “conceit,” which can refer to imagination, design, or pride.  Throughout the story of Hamlet, Shakespeare uses wordplay to twist the concept of “conception.”  Hamlet speaks of pregnancy both literally and figuratively.  After all, to conceive is to create, and for one to be conceited he or she must have created a larger than life image of one’s self.  Do the physically weak compensate with strong imaginations?  What does this say about Shakespeare — for what lack of physical strength was he compensating?  Maybe only an entrepreneurial bard can truly capture the essence of what it is like to be a king, for if one is a king they may lack the imagination to express such character, especially to the common man through arts and entertainment.

yod-nutty-bars

Shakespeare Insult Kit

Combine one word from each of the three columns below, prefaced with “Thou”:

Column 1	    Column 2            Column 3 

artless             base-court          apple-john
bawdy               bat-fowling         baggage
beslubbering        beef-witted         barnacle
bootless            beetle-headed       bladder
churlish            boil-brained        boar-pig
cockered            clapper-clawed      bugbear
clouted             clay-brained        bum-bailey
craven              common-kissing      canker-blossom
currish             crook-pated         clack-dish
dankish             dismal-dreaming     clotpole
dissembling         dizzy-eyed          coxcomb
droning             doghearted          codpiece
errant              dread-bolted        death-token
fawning             earth-vexing        dewberry
fobbing             elf-skinned         flap-dragon
froward             fat-kidneyed        flax-wench
frothy              fen-sucked          flirt-gill
gleeking            flap-mouthed        foot-licker
goatish             fly-bitten          fustilarian
gorbellied          folly-fallen        giglet
impertinent         fool-born           gudgeon
infectious          full-gorged         haggard
jarring             guts-griping        harpy
loggerheaded        half-faced          hedge-pig
lumpish             hasty-witted        horn-beast
mammering           hedge-born          hugger-mugger
mangled             hell-hated          joithead
mewling             idle-headed         lewdster
paunchy             ill-breeding        lout
pribbling           ill-nurtured        maggot-pie
puking              knotty-pated        malt-worm
puny                milk-livered        mammet
qualling            motley-minded       measle
rank                onion-eyed          minnow
reeky               plume-plucked       miscreant
roguish             pottle-deep         moldwarp
ruttish             pox-marked          mumble-news
saucy               reeling-ripe        nut-hook
spleeny             rough-hewn          pigeon-egg
spongy              rude-growing        pignut
surly               rump-fed            puttock
tottering           shard-borne         pumpion
unmuzzled           sheep-biting        ratsbane
vain                spur-galled         scut
venomed             swag-bellied        skainsmate
villainous          tardy-gaited        strumpet
warped              tickle-brained      varlot
wayward             toad-spotted        vassal
weedy               unchin-snouted      whey-face
yeasty              weather-bitten      wagtail
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57 thoughts on “To Quote The Great Bard

  1. The Countess dispensing some motherly wisdom to Bertram before he departs for France. (All’s Well That Ends Well)
    “Love all, trust a few,
    Do wrong to none: be able for thine enemy
    Rather in power than use, and keep thy friend
    Under thy own life’s key: be cheque’d for silence,
    But never tax’d for speech.”

    Like

  2. To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them. To die: to sleep;

    Like

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